THE WHITE HOUSE HONORS ROTARY WOMEN
FOR THEIR HUMANITARIAN SERVICE Image

 That's right! 20% of those honored are Alaskans!

Senior Rotary leaders gathered Tuesday at the White House to honor  for their service projects,  attended by members of U.S. President Barack Obama's senior staff.

The Rotary members presented their projects, in the hopes of creating new inroads for government partnerships and support.

"This is recognition of the great work that they do but also serves as a great vehicle to inspire others to do similar kinds of things," said Rotary General Secretary John Hewko. "One of the things we're doing a better job of is sharing our story to the non-Rotary world."

The honorees were selected by Rotary senior leaders and endorsed by the White House from clubs around the U.S. but their projects touch lives across the globe.

Carolyn Jones, of Anchorage, Alaska, has served numerous times as a Rotary volunteer in Russia, three of them as a preschool teacher for developmentally delayed children in orphanages. During her presentation she lamented hearing about a child sold for a bottle of vodka, and vowed to use her honor as a stepping stone to save more lives.

Carol Butler, also from Anchorage, highlighted two projects. The first is a statewide suicide prevention plan. According to Butler, Alaska has the highest rate of suicide per capita in the nation. The public awareness plan educates Rotary members and Alaska residents to recognize the warning signs of someone in crisis. She also talked about her club's partnership with the , a collective of dentists, staff, and other volunteers who provide free dental services throughout the state.

 

"Dental care is a gateway to good health," says Butler. "There's an increasing problem nationwide with people seeking dental care in emergency rooms."

 

THE WHITE HOUSE HONORS ROTARY WOMEN
FOR THEIR HUMANITARIAN SERVICE Image

 That's right! 20% of those honored are Alaskans!

Senior Rotary leaders gathered Tuesday at the White House to honor  for their service projects,  attended by members of U.S. President Barack Obama's senior staff.

The Rotary members presented their projects, in the hopes of creating new inroads for government partnerships and support.

"This is recognition of the great work that they do but also serves as a great vehicle to inspire others to do similar kinds of things," said Rotary General Secretary John Hewko. "One of the things we're doing a better job of is sharing our story to the non-Rotary world."

The honorees were selected by Rotary senior leaders and endorsed by the White House from clubs around the U.S. but their projects touch lives across the globe.

Carolyn Jones, of Anchorage, Alaska, has served numerous times as a Rotary volunteer in Russia, three of them as a preschool teacher for developmentally delayed children in orphanages. During her presentation she lamented hearing about a child sold for a bottle of vodka, and vowed to use her honor as a stepping stone to save more lives.

Carol Butler, also from Anchorage, highlighted two projects. The first is a statewide suicide prevention plan. According to Butler, Alaska has the highest rate of suicide per capita in the nation. The public awareness plan educates Rotary members and Alaska residents to recognize the warning signs of someone in crisis. She also talked about her club's partnership with the , a collective of dentists, staff, and other volunteers who provide free dental services throughout the state.

 

"Dental care is a gateway to good health," says Butler. "There's an increasing problem nationwide with people seeking dental care in emergency rooms."